Kayak Expedition

29 Apr

Wednesday unfurled the first (relatively) calm and immensely sunny day since the ice went out on Blue Lake which naturally meant an observational kayak expedition around the lake perimeter was in good order.  With a light wind blowing from the north-west at 5 to 10 mph, I launched my vessel from the southern West Basin shoreline and paddled towards Mermaid Bay.

Nearing Mermaid Bay on Blue Lake

Nearing Mermaid Bay on Blue Lake

I took Dr. Expert’s advice and stayed close to land on account of the polar water temperatures.  If the kayak were to meet a rogue wave and, say, capsize, I would be plunged into hostile Blue Lake conditions as cold as the Bering Sea itself.  Accordingly, in a matter of minutes, all muscle activity would cease coordinating and one could not swim to shore much less hang onto a boat and wait for help to arrive.  I am thinking now that survival suits like the fishermen have on Deadliest Catch are a very wise idea.

Blue Lake Tunnel Panorama

Blue Lake Tunnel Panorama

On my journey, I did not see any king crab swimming in Blue Lake’s Siberian waters but I did espy a few activities of note.  Most of the official buoys are still keeping the shoreline company with the exception of the “Slow No Wake” buoy leading into Mermaid Bay.  Ample property maintenance proved all the rage on Blue Lake’s southeast corridor with one citizen contemplatively reflecting on a half-submerged diving dock.  An unofficial measurement of the water level beneath the tunnel put the depth at the shallowest point at no more than two feet.  The same levels held true, too, for The Straits of Colianni.

Approaching The Straits of Colianni on Blue Lake in the Spring

Approaching The Straits of Colianni on Blue Lake in the Spring

The Straits of Colianni on Blue Lake in the Spring

The Straits of Colianni on Blue Lake in the Spring

Following The Straits of Colianni directly south, a backhoe dug a pit or moved some earth around on top of a slight hill.  On the north shore of the West Basin, a young gentleman most enthusiastically wielded a leaf blower.  An ATV or fortified golf cart motored around Camp Agawak.

The Northern Shoreline of Blue Lake

The Northern Shoreline of Blue Lake

Modifications, too, have come to Seagull Island which is currently overrun with mergansers.  A peculiar pit sits on the sand blob which, I’m guessing, once held a feathered something’s eggs.

Mergansers Fly from Seagull Island on Blue Lake

Mergansers Fly from Seagull Island on Blue Lake

Peculiar Pit on Seagull Island

Peculiar Pit on Seagull Island

I haven’t seen many boats out on the waters or even in the water – certainly less than I can count on one hand – but expect that to change all in good time.  I returned to my embarkation point in the late afternoon, about an hour and fifteen minutes after I began my expedition, quite comfortable and never once capsized.

Blue Lake in the Spring

Blue Lake in the Spring

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One Response to “Kayak Expedition”

  1. winkle - bull April 30, 2009 at 5:47 am #

    Rocky and I will be up there soon to chase the birds away from our shore. I hope the water isn’t too cool for my sensitive feet – I’ll need a big drink after my long trip in the car. Hope to see you on Friday for Saturday. “The Winkster”

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